Find La Mancha at Doheny Library

Posted by .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) on 01/22/09

Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote has captivated readers ever since its first volume appeared in 1605. The novel traces the adventures of a Spanish hidalgo who believes he’s living in a chivalric romance, seeking the favor of his Dulcinea and encountering imaginary foes along the way. In displays of rare illustrated editions from the USC Libraries’ L.A. Murillo Cervantes Collection, When Windmills Are Giants follows the knight and his companion Sancho Panza as they crisscross the countryside with comical—and at times devastating—results.

Dr. Luis Andres Murillo, who received his B.A. and M.A. in Spanish literature from USC, donated the collection to the Boeckmann Center for Latin American and Iberian Studies in the USC Libraries' special collections. You can learn more about the exhibition and Cervantes resources at the university by visiting librarian Barbara Robinson's Cervantes LibGuide.

The opening reception for When Windmills Are Giants will take place on Thursday, February 19 from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. in the Treasure Room at Doheny Memorial Library. Cervantes expert and USC College professor Sherry Velasco will speak about Don Quixote and film and the lasting impact of what many scholars consider to be the first modern novel. You can RSVP for the reception online or by calling 213-740-1744. Contact Tyson Gaskill at gaskill@usc.edu or 213-740-2070 for event information. The reception received support from the Visions and Voices arts and humanities initiative as part of the Cinematic Cervantes series of events.

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Here are plates from two of the illustrated editions of Don Quixote in the L.A. Murillo Cervantes Collection at the USC Libraries:

 

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Illustration from Don Kikhot (Moscow: Khudozhestvennoi Literatury, 1953–1954), translated by N. Liubimova

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Gustave Doré illustration from L'ingénieux hidalgo don Quichotte de la Manche (Paris: L. Hachette, 1869)

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